Blog

The NIESR blog is a forum for Institute research staff to provide an informed, independent view on current economic issues and recent NIESR research. The views expressed here are those of the authors, and are not necessarily those of the Institute.

Professor Jagjit S. Chadha

Posted: 17 February, 2017 - 13:12 with: Comments
There is a growing sense that globalisation, by equalising the international price for labour and for capital, has acted to reduce both real wages and real interest rates – the former means that labour earns less but the latter tends to inflate asset prices. This wedge in the return to capital and labour may help us understand why income and wealth inequality has increased in the recent past.

Professor Roger Farmer

Posted: 8 February, 2017 - 17:51 with: Comments
Last year, I was invited to present a keynote address to the 20th annual conference of the FMM Research Network on Macroeconomics and Macroeconomic Policies, “Towards Pluralism in Macroeconomics”, held in Berlin on October 20th – 22nd.

Graham Hacche

Iana Liadze

Posted: 7 February, 2017 - 10:11 with: Comments
The February 2017 National Institute Economic Review discusses the possible consequences for the US economy of the significant changes in economic policy promised by the new US administration. 

Professor Alex Bryson

Lucy Stokes

Posted: 3 February, 2017 - 12:41 with: Comments
In yesterday’s blog post we discussed findings from our research on older workers and the workplace. Our focus was on the experiences of older workers, but today we consider the employer perspective. The fact that older individuals are remaining in work is good news for the individuals concerned, since working is associated with higher incomes and better health.  It is also good for the Exchequer, increasing the tax take.  But is it good for employers?

Professor Alex Bryson

Lucy Stokes

Posted: 2 February, 2017 - 10:24 with: Comments
More and more older individuals are working. It’s good news that more people are working longer, with potential benefits for both individuals and the economy. But employment rates still drop notably when people reach their 50s and 60s.

Professor Iain Begg

Posted: 1 February, 2017 - 11:09 with: Comments
Rules have become an increasingly prominent – even defining – feature of EU economic governance as a result of the various reforms undertaken to resolve the euro crisis. There are now rules on fiscal deficits and debt levels, set out in the Stability and Growth Pact (SGP), and an EU Directive required Member States to enshrine fiscal rules in their national legal order.