Blog

The NIESR blog is a forum for Institute research staff to provide an informed, independent view on current economic issues and recent NIESR research. The views expressed here are those of the authors, and are not necessarily those of the Institute.

Dr Angus Armstrong

Posted: 5 July, 2016 - 17:04 with: Comments
The UK’s decision to leave the EU is a watershed event. It may bring to an end the free movement of labour and limit the free trade of goods and services between the UK and EU. This follows hot on the heels of the fragmentation of international finance in the aftermath of the global financial crisis. How world leaders respond will determine whether Brexit is a set-back to globalisation, or part of deeper retrenchment.

Jonathan Portes

Posted: 3 July, 2016 - 16:39 with: Comments
Before the referendum, it appeared that a Brexit vote would mean that the UK faced a clear choice on immigration policy.  If we wanted as far as possible to retain access to the Single Market,  either by maintaining membership of the European Economic Area (like Norway) or via a series of bilateral agreements (like Switzerland) then we would need to accept that freedom of movement would continue much as now.   Recognising this – and regarding it as an unacceptable price to pay – both UKIP and, eventu

Jonathan Portes

Posted: 30 June, 2016 - 15:58 with: Comments
A week is a short time in economics.  So what , if anything, have we learned about the economic impact of the UK’s vote to leave the European Union?  I would highlight four key points.

Dr Angus Armstrong

Posted: 24 June, 2016 - 12:04 with: Comments
Uncertainty has gripped financial markets in the UK and around the world. The immediate response this morning has been unprecedented in the post Bretton Woods era. In the space of six hours sterling has fallen around 10 per cent against the dollar to the lowest level for 31 years. Stock market futures indicate that the equity markets will fall by around 10%. Further gyrations are expected over the coming days and weeks as market participants grapple with the implications of the results. The response so far reflects a weaker expected economic outlook at home and abroad.

Jonathan Portes

Posted: 24 June, 2016 - 08:31 with: Comments
The Prime Minister's foolish pledge to reduce net immigration to the tens of thousands has come back to bite him.   It ensured that the key question for the referendum was whether the ability to "take control" of immigration policy was worth the risk to the UK economy from Brexit.  The electorate have given their verdict. 
Posted: 20 June, 2016 - 10:58 with: Comments
Authors: Jagjit Chadha[1], Paul Johnson[2] and John Van Reenen[3] The economic consequences of leaving the EU have naturally been a central focus of the referendum campaign. As June 23 draws near we bring together the conclusions from our research on the likely consequences, and reflect on some of the claims made.