Blog

The NIESR blog is a forum for Institute research staff to provide an informed, independent view on current economic issues and recent NIESR research. The views expressed here are those of the authors, and are not necessarily those of the Institute.

Rebecca Piggott

Oriol Carreras

Jack Meaning

Simon Kirby

Posted: 23 May, 2016 - 18:21 with: Comments
In recent weeks there have been a number of high-profile reports on the economic consequences of a vote to leave the European Union. Among others, the OECD, HM Treasury and we, at the National Institute, have all now published estimates of what the economic landscape might look like in the immediate aftermath of a leave vote on June 23rd. ¹ NIESR’s analysis of the short and long-run impact can be found here, Baker et al (2016).

Jonathan Portes

Posted: 16 May, 2016 - 20:59 with: Comments
Last week's ONS publication on migration statistics threw some light on the debate, although they generated even more heat – and frankly some flat out lies, as I explained here. However, this Wednesday, we'll get a different set of numbers; this will focus not on how many migrants are entering or leaving the country, short or long-term but how many actually live and work here – which is after all most of what matters.

Rebecca Piggott

Oriol Carreras

James Warren

Jack Meaning

Dr Monique Ebell

Posted: 12 May, 2016 - 10:44 with: Comments
A vote to leave the EU would represent a significant shock to the UK economy. In this piece, we analyse the consequences for the UK economy of leaving the EU, assuming that the UK would no longer have a free trade agreement with the EU.

Jonathan Portes

Posted: 29 April, 2016 - 11:49 with: Comments
The OECD’s report on the economic impact of Brexit is probably the most comprehensive and analytically rigorous produced so far (NIESR's own contribution to this debate will be published on May 10).

Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 27 April, 2016 - 10:26 with: Comments
A large section of the public would like to see significant restrictions on free movement whatever the result of the EU referendum. Employers have a particular interest in the outcome and have joined the debate but there has been little independent assessment of their position on the issue. Our research, out today, aimed to help fill this gap through research with employers in three sectors – food and drink, hospitality and construction.

Jonathan Portes

Posted: 19 April, 2016 - 16:08 with: Comments
The Treasury analysis of the economic impacts of Brexit, published yesterday, has already been extensively examined.