Blog: January 2017

Dr Angus Armstrong

Posted: 30 January, 2017 - 10:29 with: Comments

A basic principle in economics is that there is no free lunch. To get something we want, we have to give up something we like. The Prime Minister made crystal clear in her Lancaster House speech last week that Brexit is about restoring parliamentary sovereignty. What she failed to make clear was what we will be giving up.

Dr Monique Ebell

Posted: 27 January, 2017 - 09:26 with: Comments

Theresa May's 12 point plan for negotiating with the EU included two key announcements regarding trade: the UK will not seek membership of the single market, and the UK wishes to abandon the EU’s common external tariff, in order to be free to negotiate trade agreements with third countries.

This blog provides a range of projected impacts on UK trade of these policies.

Prof Jagjit S. Chadha

Posted: 20 January, 2017 - 13:09 with: Comments

How does a government reduce its public debt burden relative to national income, which is what I mean by a fiscal consolidation? There are a number of obvious instruments that might bear immediate fruit: reduce the flow of government deficits by increasing taxes or reducing government expenditure or to develop expenditures that increase output by more than the increase in the deficit. The latter is of course the search for the holy grail of a multiplier greater than one and the former is often termed 'austerity'.

 

Dr Angus Armstrong

Posted: 16 January, 2017 - 18:11 with: Comments

At noon today, the Prime Minister will set-out the government’s strategy for Brexit. Mrs May will no doubt repeat that Brexit means Brexit. But the important question is what will be the UK’s future economic arrangement with the EU? The Prime Minister will try and keep her options open, but the trade-offs involved seem to make a ‘Hard Brexit’ inevitable 

Prof Jagjit S. Chadha

Posted: 13 January, 2017 - 09:24 with: Comments

Outside it is rather miserable. It is wet, windy and dark. And Blue Monday looms. But at the Institute January is a forecast month, so we are kept warm by the comfortable whirring of economists running models, assessing data, understanding deviations of outcomes from expectations and applying dollops of judgement.

Prof Jagjit S. Chadha

Posted: 6 January, 2017 - 16:55 with: Comments

    In a Keynesian view of the world, the joint actions of monetary and fiscal policy set the level of overall demand in the economy.