Blog by author

Ana Rincon-Aznar

John Forth

Posted: 5 April, 2018 - 16:42

The past few months have been difficult for some of the UK’s largest low-paying sectors, with frequent news stories telling of squeezed profits and store closures among high street retailers and restaurant chains. In retail, the ‘bricks and mortar’ outlets are locked in a ‘survival-of-the-fittest’ battle with online competitors, whilst restaurants are suffering from a decline in spending on leisure activities due to inflation and stagnant wages. Last week’s rise in the National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage rates will only add to the challenges.

Prof Alex Bryson

John Forth

Posted: 4 July, 2017 - 09:58

Some have expressed disquiet over the long-term sustainability of the 1% cap on pay settlements first introduced in 2010 and due to continue until 2019/20.  Independent experts who advise government on setting pay for the 2.5 million public servants covered by Pay Review Bodies (PRBs) have cited pay restraint as a reason for the difficulties recruiting and retaining high quality staff to deliver health services, education and other public services.  

Prof Alex Bryson

John Forth

Posted: 29 July, 2015 - 09:11

In the years since the financial crisis in 2008, the UK has seen poor GDP growth combine with sustained employment levels to push down output per worker. In this blog, Alex Bryson and John Forth explain what we know about why labour productivity has so been so dismal and whether we can solve the ‘productivity puzzle’. 

John Forth

Posted: 15 July, 2015 - 18:51

The government has today announced plans to place further restrictions on ballots for industrial action. This blog looks at the prevalence of industrial action in Britain and the likely implications of the Bill for employment relations.

How common are strikes in Britain today?

Prof Alex Bryson

John Forth

Posted: 16 February, 2015 - 11:39

Across Britain around half of all listed firms run some kind of all-employee stock purchase plan (ESPP). These offer workers the opportunity to buy shares in the firm at discounted rates. But why do firms do this, and what do they hope to get out of them? Perhaps they are just a tax-efficient way of paying workers?

John Forth

Posted: 13 December, 2013 - 14:02

The Chancellor’s Autumn Statement offered some good news on the economy, with the rate of growth forecast at 1.4% for 2013 and 2.4% for 2014. Those figures will be welcomed by employees in the private sector who will recognise the positive implications for their job prospects. But for public sector workers, the news was not so good, with the Chancellor indicating that he wants to extend the current freeze in total public spending into 2018-19.