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Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 20 December, 2016 - 12:45

Christmas is here and being marked in the British way by excessive consumption of food and drink, harvested, processed, delivered and served thanks to the labour of migrant workers. 

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Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 11 August, 2016 - 09:00

The referendum result took the nation by surprise. Among others, politicians and journalists voiced this collective shock, expressed by some as jubilation, by others as dismay and even by regret.

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Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 15 June, 2016 - 12:01

There is now little doubt that immigration will be the issue that will decide the referendum result. But it is danger of being decided on fiction rather than facts about its impact. We have never needed evidence about migration more. We do know a lot. We know that any statistical effects of migration on jobs and wages are very small. But statistics are often mistrusted.

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Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 27 April, 2016 - 10:26

A large section of the public would like to see significant restrictions on free movement whatever the result of the EU referendum. Employers have a particular interest in the outcome and have joined the debate but there has been little independent assessment of their position on the issue. Our research, out today, aimed to help fill this gap through research with employers in three sectors – food and drink, hospitality and construction.

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Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 11 February, 2016 - 12:30

For some time opinion polls have shown that the public sees immigration as one of the most important issues facing Britain.

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Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 24 August, 2015 - 00:00

A Freedom of Information (FoI) request from Welfare Weekly has led the Department for Work and Pensions to withdraw a leaflet featuring fictional case studies from ‘Sarah’ and ‘Zac’. The leaflet gave Sarah’s reflections on being sanctioned:

‘I didn’t think a CV would help me but my work coach told me that all employers need one. I didn’t have a good reason for not doing it and I was told I’d lose some of my payment’.

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Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 30 June, 2015 - 09:16

The lower educational achievement of white working-class pupils has long been recognised as a key challenge for schools. But in recent years, the yardstick against which their under-performance has been measured has changed – from middle-class pupils to children from ethnic minorities. This is due to evidence that pupils from ethnic minorities, including recent migrants and those with English as a second language, have been increasingly outperforming white working-class pupils.

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Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 12 June, 2015 - 12:42

How children think about their own ability can affect their progress and achievement at school, according to a number of leading education researchers. The work of Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck and her concept of “mindset” has been particularly influential in the way teachers are trying to change their pupils' views of their own intelligence.

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Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 12 January, 2015 - 13:06

When we think of welfare to work schemes we picture job centres, the Work Programme and providers such as A4E and Ingeus. We think of media representations of jobcentres,  through television sitcoms such as The Job Lot or the League of Gentleman's dispiriting job club run by the cruel pen-fetishist Pauline.

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Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 30 September, 2014 - 10:46

Much has been made of Ed Miliband’s failure to deliver sections of his conference speech on the economy and on immigration. But he didn’t forget to repeat the policy first announced just before the party’s 2013 conference to require employers to recruit an apprentice for every non-EU migrant they employ:

 

 ‘If you want to bring in a worker from outside the European Union, that’s OK, but you must provide apprenticeships to the next generation’

 

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Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 27 August, 2014 - 09:44

What do the public think about international students? Do they see them simply as generating revenue for universities or as longer term migrants who can bring new talent to the UK? New research by British Future shows that there is support for international students among the general public who both recognise the benefits they bring and believe we should make us of their skills and talent.

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Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 5 November, 2013 - 07:12

While the debate over the service impacts of migration from the EU becomes ever more heated, it’s business as usual for UK employers who recruit migrants to fill skills gaps and to get the expertise and talent they need. A new NIESR report takes an in-depth look at why they do this and at the views of the general public who work with migrants. It finds a more positive picture than is often painted.

Re-focusing the debate on the real issue of economic migration

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Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 23 September, 2013 - 11:02

In his pre-conference speech, Labour Party leader Ed Miliband predictably raised immigration, but rather less predictably, turned the spotlight on skilled migration, announcing that:

'We are going to say to any firm that wants to bring in a foreign worker that they also have to train up someone who is a local worker, training up the next generation.'

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Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 10 September, 2013 - 21:55

At the 2012 Latitude Festival comedian Shappi Khorsandi suggested that, rather than book a clown for their daughter’s birthday party, parents should hire a careers adviser. If the findings of the Ofsted report into careers guidance are anything to go by, this might be parents’ best option. The much-anticipated report by the schools inspector body presents damning evidence of the poor support provided by schools to young people at crucial cross-roads in decision-making.

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Dr Heather Rolfe

Posted: 2 July, 2013 - 12:10

UK immigration policy has been increasingly focused on high-level skills and enterprise, supported by frequent statements about attracting the ‘brightest and best’.

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