Blog by author

David Wilkinson

Prof Alex Bryson

Lucy Stokes

Posted: 26 March, 2018 - 16:42

For decades, private sector firms have been aware of the benefits they can derive by investing in the management of their employees. Incentivising employees through individual and group performance pay allows firms to attract the best talent and increases worker effort. Fostering employee ‘ownership’ of the production process through team-working, initially pushed by Japanese manufacturing firms like Toyota, are now widely diffused across industries across the globe. But it is only relatively recently that providers of public services have thought to apply the same techniques in sectors such as education.

 

David Wilkinson

Prof Alex Bryson

Lucy Stokes

Posted: 4 February, 2018 - 00:00

The government’s strategy for improving educational outcomes focuses on improving schools’ performance.  But how important are schools in explaining variance in pupil attainment? There is surprisingly little evidence on the issue.  We sought to address this question in an article for the February 2018 edition of the National Institute Economic Review, examining the attainment of half a million pupils in more than 3,000 English secondary schools over the period 2009/10 to 2015/16. 

David Wilkinson

Posted: 15 August, 2013 - 09:12

New NIESR research published today by the Department for Business Innovation and Skills highlights the importance of graduate skills to the UK economy.  Looking across developed economies, we found that - as both economic theory and common sense would predict - countries which increased their share of graduates in the workforce saw labour productivity grow faster.  For the UK, we estimate that roughly one-third of the increase in labour productivity between 1994 and 2005 can be attributed to the accumulation of graduate skills in the labour force.   In other words, a substantial share of the UK's economic growth over this period was driven by the expansion of higher education and the resulting increase in the proportion of workers who have a graduate-level qualification.