Blog by author

Prof Alex Bryson

David Wilkinson

Lucy Stokes

Posted: 26 March, 2018 - 16:42

For decades, private sector firms have been aware of the benefits they can derive by investing in the management of their employees. Incentivising employees through individual and group performance pay allows firms to attract the best talent and increases worker effort. Fostering employee ‘ownership’ of the production process through team-working, initially pushed by Japanese manufacturing firms like Toyota, are now widely diffused across industries across the globe. But it is only relatively recently that providers of public services have thought to apply the same techniques in sectors such as education.

 

Prof Alex Bryson

David Wilkinson

Lucy Stokes

Posted: 4 February, 2018 - 00:00

The government’s strategy for improving educational outcomes focuses on improving schools’ performance.  But how important are schools in explaining variance in pupil attainment? There is surprisingly little evidence on the issue.  We sought to address this question in an article for the February 2018 edition of the National Institute Economic Review, examining the attainment of half a million pupils in more than 3,000 English secondary schools over the period 2009/10 to 2015/16. 

Prof Francis Green

Prof Alex Bryson

Posted: 1 February, 2018 - 07:58

In recent years governments of all hues have urged private schools to sponsor state schools to help raise education standards in state schools. In 2012 Lord Adonis, who had earlier been Labour’s Minister for Schools, argued that successful private schools, whose “DNA” incorporated “independence, excellence, innovation, social mission”, should sponsor state academy schools.

Prof Alex Bryson

John Forth

Posted: 4 July, 2017 - 09:58

Some have expressed disquiet over the long-term sustainability of the 1% cap on pay settlements first introduced in 2010 and due to continue until 2019/20.  Independent experts who advise government on setting pay for the 2.5 million public servants covered by Pay Review Bodies (PRBs) have cited pay restraint as a reason for the difficulties recruiting and retaining high quality staff to deliver health services, education and other public services.  

Prof Alex Bryson

Lucy Stokes

Posted: 3 February, 2017 - 12:41

In yesterday’s blog post we discussed findings from our research on older workers and the workplace. Our focus was on the experiences of older workers, but today we consider the employer perspective. The fact that older individuals are remaining in work is good news for the individuals concerned, since working is associated with higher incomes and better health.  It is also good for the Exchequer, increasing the tax take.  But is it good for employers?

Prof Alex Bryson

Lucy Stokes

Posted: 2 February, 2017 - 10:24

More and more older individuals are working. It’s good news that more people are working longer, with potential benefits for both individuals and the economy. But employment rates still drop notably when people reach their 50s and 60s.

Prof Alex Bryson

John Forth

Posted: 29 July, 2015 - 09:11

In the years since the financial crisis in 2008, the UK has seen poor GDP growth combine with sustained employment levels to push down output per worker. In this blog, Alex Bryson and John Forth explain what we know about why labour productivity has so been so dismal and whether we can solve the ‘productivity puzzle’. 

Prof Alex Bryson

Posted: 17 February, 2015 - 14:24

Can the number of people born in the same year as you (i.e., the size of your birth cohort) affect your chances of success in life?  Or how about the month of year you are born in (i.e., your relative age), does that matter in terms of predicting success? If you are a professional athlete where success and performance can be pretty accurately measured, does any of this birth stuff really matter?

Prof Alex Bryson

John Forth

Posted: 16 February, 2015 - 11:39

Across Britain around half of all listed firms run some kind of all-employee stock purchase plan (ESPP). These offer workers the opportunity to buy shares in the firm at discounted rates. But why do firms do this, and what do they hope to get out of them? Perhaps they are just a tax-efficient way of paying workers?

Prof Alex Bryson

Posted: 30 October, 2014 - 10:41

Citizens' wellbeing is rising to the top of the political agenda in Britain.  Just yesterday the government and its partners announced a What Works Centre for Wellbeing which initially has over £3.5 million over three years to investigate the determinants of wellbeing and how to improve it.  This follows government investments in wellbeing metrics developed and pioneered by the Office for National Statistics which, some argue, should be the basis for

Prof Alex Bryson

Posted: 5 November, 2013 - 13:48

What's the big deal with pay for performance?

Keith A. Bender (University of Aberdeen) and Alex Bryson (NIESR and CEP)

Economists get pretty fixated about paying workers for their performance. That's why we are devoting November's Special Issue of the NIESR Review to the topic. (You can get your free copies of the articles in the Special Issue using the links below).

Prof Alex Bryson

Posted: 17 April, 2013 - 13:43

 Positive Employee Attitudes: How Much Human Resource Management Do You Need?

Prof Alex Bryson

Posted: 15 April, 2013 - 21:55

Are You Happy While You Work?

Alex Bryson (NIESR and CEP) and George MacKerron (University of Sussex)