Blog

The NIESR blog is a forum for Institute research staff to provide an informed, independent view on current economic issues and recent NIESR research. The views expressed here are those of the authors, and are not necessarily those of the Institute.

David Wilkinson

Professor Alex Bryson

Lucy Stokes

Posted: 4 February, 2018 - 00:00 with: Comments
The government’s strategy for improving educational outcomes focuses on improving schools’ performance.  But how important are schools in explaining variance in pupil attainment? There is surprisingly little evidence on the issue.  We sought to address this question in an article for the February 2018 edition of the National Institute Economic Review, examining the attainment of half a million pupils in more than 3,000 English secondary schools over the period 2009/10 to 2015/16. 

Prof Francis Green

Professor Alex Bryson

Posted: 1 February, 2018 - 07:58 with: Comments
In recent years governments of all hues have urged private schools to sponsor state schools to help raise education standards in state schools. In 2012 Lord Adonis, who had earlier been Labour’s Minister for Schools, argued that successful private schools, whose “DNA” incorporated “independence, excellence, innovation, social mission”, should sponsor state academy schools.

Jason Lennard

Posted: 24 January, 2018 - 16:34 with: Comments
A fog of uncertainty has hung over the British economy since the summer of 2016. The EU referendum, snap general election and hung parliament coincided with spikes in quantitative measures of uncertainty. The Bank of England, HM Treasury and the International Monetary Fund argue that this uncertainty will not pass without economic consequences.

Prof Peter Dolton

Posted: 15 January, 2018 - 11:11 with: Comments
The NHS is in financial turmoil. The country in stricken with Aussie flu, A&E units up and down the country are being swamped. There is an acute shortage of hospital beds and the 4hr wait is being missed by up to a quarter of A&E units.  Solutions are desperately being sought. A National Inquiry is being called for and many are suggesting that a hypothecated tax, earmarked for NHS spending, is the way forward. Such a tax is very unlikely to work.

Prof Jagjit S. Chadha

Dr Monique Ebell

Dr Garry Young

Posted: 5 January, 2018 - 12:17 with: Comments
Three senior members of the Institute were asked by the FT for their views on the year ahead.  In the interests on transparency, we publish those replies.  The answers given are from the Director, Professor Jagjit Chadha (JC), the Director of Macroeconomic Modelling and Forecasts, Dr. Garry Young (GY), and the Associate Research Director for Trade, Investment and Productivity, Dr Monique Ebell (ME).    

Arno Hantzsche

Posted: 19 December, 2017 - 16:07 with: Comments
A previous blog discussed the implications for government bond yields of changes to euro area monetary policy, namely a reduction of assets purchased by the European Central Bank. However, this is unlikely to be the only development that will affect long-term interest rates European governments pay on their debt, and ultimately firms pay to fund investment. A second development, which may be taken into account by financial markets, is the intensifying debate about institutional reforms in the euro area.