The Broken Housing Market Conference – Highlights from Event on 1st June 2018

 

Highlights from our “Broken Housing Market” Conference, held on 1st June at Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE). This free one-day conference brought together leading academics, policymakers and practitioners to discuss what is “broken” about the UK housing market and how we might go about fixing it.


UPDATE: Material from our August Economic Review on Housing:

Reflecting on the Broken Housing Market – the introduction to the National Institute Economic Review, no 245, August 2018, by Prof. Jagjit Chadha and David Nguyen

We also published 3 blogs on topics covered in the Review:


You can find the full programme here. Presentations included:

Luisa Corrado (Tor Vergata Rome): “Consumption Dynamics, Housing Collateral and Stabilisation Policies: A Way Forward for Policy Co-Ordination?” (joint with Jagjit Chadha and Germana Corrado) – Please find the presentation’s slides here.

David Miles (Imperial College): “Houses across time and across place” (joint with James Sefton) – Please find the presentation’s slides here.

Ian Mulheirn (Oxford Economics): “Modelling UK House Prices and Home Ownership” (joint with Nishaal Gooroochurn) – Please find the presentation’s slides here.

Richard Donnell (Hometrack): “Cross tenure housing affordability from a market and end-user perspective” – Please find the presentation’s slides here.

Dame Kate Barker (Taylor Wimpey) Please find the presentation’s slides here.

Paul Cheshire (LSE): “Broken market or broken policy? The unintended consequences of restrictive planning” – Please find the presentation’s slides here.

John Muellbauer (Oxford): “Housing, Debt and the Economy: A Tale of Two Countries” – Please find the presentation’s slides here. 

Christine Whitehead (LSE): “Housing policy and the changing tenure mix” – Please find the presentation’s slides here

Liam Halligan (Telegraph): “A Manifesto for Change” – Please find the presentation’s slides here.

 

Some of the research themes emerging at the conference will be explored further in our next Economic Review, out on 1st August, as our Director Jagjit Chadha explains below, in the first of a selection of short clips featuring some the speakers. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prof Ken Gibb, Director of the UK Collaborative Centre for Housing Evidence (CaCHE), giving an overview of the Conference:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keynote speaker, Dame Kate Barker, explaining why supply is only part of the solution to the housing crisis:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prof David Miles, Professor of Financial Economics at Imperial College London, highlights the key points from his presentation at the Conference:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ian Mulheirn, Director of Consult at Oxford Economics, shares the main highlights from his presentation ‘Modelling House Prices and Home Ownership‘:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Donnell, Research and Insight Director, Hometrack, reflects on why we should not consider the housing market as one but many different markets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Levell, Senior Research Economist at the Institute For Fiscal Studies (IFS), discusses research that he presented at the Conference:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prof Ken Gibb, Director of the UK Collaborative Centre for Housing Evidence (CaCHE), giving an overview of the Conference:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keynote speaker, Dame Kate Barker, explaining why supply is only part of the solution to the housing crisis:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prof David Miles, Professor of Financial Economics at Imperial College London, highlights the key points from his presentation at the Conference:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ian Mulheirn, Director of Consult at Oxford Economics, shares the main highlights from his presentation ‘Modelling House Prices and Home Ownership‘:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Donnell, Research and Insight Director, Hometrack, reflects on why we should not consider the housing market as one but many different markets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Levell, Senior Research Economist at the Institute For Fiscal Studies (IFS), discusses research that he presented at the Conference: