Festival of Social Science 2020 at NIESR

Date: 
Saturday, 7 November, 2020 - 10:30 to Sunday, 15 November, 2020 - 10:30
Location: 
Online

The ESRC Festival of Social Science is an annual celebration of the social sciences and will be taking place this year from 7-15 November. 

 "The Festival of Social Science is one of the largest co-ordinated endeavours undertaken by a science community and is indicative of ESRC's commitment to public engagement. 
 
“This year, with the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the 2020 Festival of Social Science will be a digital-first event featuring exciting and innovative events run by our 34 partners.
 
“Many economic and social researchers value the opportunity to share how their work helps us to better understand people, businesses, institutions, communities and wider social phenomena, and to inform decisions that can affect millions of lives. We hope these events raise awareness about how research can improve outcomes across society, inspiring some young people to pursue a career in research, and others to draw on research to understand people and the world around us."

- Professor Jennifer Rubin, ESRC Executive Chair

 

Check out the exciting events run by NIESR and our close partners below, and don't forget to follow us on Twitter @NIESROrg and to use the hashtag #ESRCFestival

 


 

Monday 09 November 2020, 11:00 - 12:00

The public finances and Covid-19: comparisons and lessons from the past

Senior researchers from the Institute for Fiscal Studies and the NIESR will join together to look at how Covid-19 has impacted the public finances. At this event, they will look at what we can learn from comparisons with the fallout from the financial crisis, as well as how uncertainty around the economy has affected public spending in the past.

Watch a recording of the event here.

 


 

Tuesday, 10 November, 2020 - 18:00 to 19:30

The Prais Lecture: How to solve the productivity puzzle

In this lecture, Lord Sainsbury answers the productivity puzzle: how do we speed up the UK's economic growth?

The 'Productivity Puzzle' has troubled economists for a generation, but there is a simple explanation. We need to understand that value-added per capita varies between the sectors of the economy depending on their production efficiency and the competitive advantage they have in their markets. If we do so, then by analysing the performance of the different sectors of the economy we can see why the economic growth of the UK has been slow and what we need to do to speed it up.

For the second annual Prais Lecture, Lord Sainsbury will seek to answer the productivity puzzle, 'how do we speed up the UK's economic growth?'. After a short presentation, he will then by joined in conversation with Sir Paul Tucker and take questions from the audience. The event will be chaired by Professor Jagjit Chadha, Director of NIESR. 

Watch a recording of the event here

 


 

Wednesday 11 November 2020, 09:00 - 11:30

Supporting Language and Communication Skills in the Early Years 

How can researchers and practitioners work together to implement and evaluate programmes supporting language development in the early years? Drawing on our work for Better Start Bradford, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges faced when delivering and evaluating a language intervention programme. This workshop will also run in December and January.

Find out more here.

 


 

Thursday 12 November 2020, 14:00 - 17:00

Diversity and Representation: A vehicle for scientific advancement 

In this webinar, we will ask if greater diversity of scientists (specifically economists) is not only a matter of fairness, but also a crucial vehicle for scientific progress. Speakers include Kristen Intemann, Carolina Alves, and Arun Advani. This event is brought to you by Rebuilding Macroeconomics in collaboration with NIESR.

Find out more here.

 


 

These events as part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science 2020 were made possible thanks to funding from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), which is part of UK Research and Innovation.