Conference and seminar output

The Performance Pay Premium

Using nationally representative linked employer-employee data we find one-quarter of employees in Britain are paid for performance. The log hourly wage gap between performance pay and fixed pay employees is .36 points.  This falls to .15 log points after controlling for observable demographic, job and workplace characteristics. It falls still further to .10 log points when comparing "like" employees in the same workplace, indicating that performance pay contracts are used in higher paying workplaces.

The UK economy: transitioning to a sustained recovery

Presentation to the 90th Kieler Konjunkturgespräch, Austrian Embassy, Berlin.

The UK economy: a balanced recovery?

Presentation to the 89th Kieler Konjunkturgespräch, Kiel Germany.

Productivity and Firm Growth Workshop: Conference Slides

This was the first of two workshops planned for this year at which new research findings on productivity and firm growth are to be presented and discussed. These workshops are expected to be of particular interest to policy-makers and other researchers who are working in these areas.

Performance Pay Workshop: Conference Slides

Economists get pretty fixated about paying workers for their performance. That's why we devoted November's Special Issue of the NIESR Review to the topic. We followed up with a one-day workshop, which was free to attend, on a first-come-first-served basis.

Pay Equity After the Equality Act 2010: Does Sexual Orientation Still Matter?

Using linked employer-employee data for Britain I find bisexual men earn around 31% less per hour less than heterosexual employees, a differential that falls to 20% having controlled for demographic, job and workplace characteristics.  The gap is apparent within workplaces and within detailed occupational classifications.

Pay Equity After the Equality Act 2010: Does Sexual Orientation Still Matter?

Using linked employer-employee data for Britain I find bisexual men earn around 31% less per hour less than heterosexual employees, a differential that falls to 20% having controlled for demographic, job and workplace characteristics. The gap is apparent within workplaces and within detailed occupational classifications. There is no wage differential between gay and heterosexual men. Among women, on the other hand, there is no wage gap between bisexuals and heterosexuals.

The Performance Pay Premium

Using nationally representative linked employer-employee data we find one-quarter of employees in Britain are paid for performance. The log hourly wage gap between performance pay and fixed pay employees is .36 points.  This falls to .15 log points after controlling for observable demographic, job and workplace characteristics. It falls still further to .10 log points when comparing "like" employees in the same workplace, indicating that performance pay contracts are used in higher paying workplaces.

Public sector debt, borrowing, taxation and fiscal rules

Evidence presented to Scottish Parliament’s Finance Committee

 

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