Economic Review Preview

The macroeconomics of de-globalisation

 

This is a preview from the National Institute Economic Review, August 2020, no 253.

 

Firm creation in the UK during lockdown

 

This is a preview from the National Institute Economic Review, August 2020, no 253.

Business creation is an informative measure of real economic activity. During exceptional events such as the Covid-19 pandemic, it is important to develop tools that allow us to measure in real time the effect of social distancing policies on the economy. The data available from the UK’s Companies House allows us to track new daily company incorporations.

The slump of the 1920s

 

This is a preview from the National Institute Economic Review, May 2020, no 252.

The largest quarterly fall in output in modern times in the UK (so far) was in the second quarter of 1921 when GDP at constant market prices fell by 12.3 per cent. This was directly followed by the largest quarterly increase in output of 13.7 per cent in the very next quarter.

Quantifying the global macroeconomic spillovers of illness and lockdown measures

 

This is a preview from the National Institute Economic Review, May 2020, no 252.

The effects of the trade war on inflation

 

This is a preview from the National Institute Economic Review, February 2020, no 251.

The (in)effectiveness of the latest round of ECB asset purchases

 

This is a preview from the National Institute Economic Review, November 2019, no 250.

 

Could a fiscal boost raise inflation in the Euro Area?

 

This is a preview from the National Institute Economic Review, November 2019, no 250.

 

The macroeconomics of fiscal give-aways

 

In this box,  which we published in our latest Review, NIER No. 249 August 2019, we evaluate the macroeconomic effects of expansionary fiscal policy measures on the UK economy. We consider two fiscal packages, one based on Labour Party policy and one based on some of the policies put forward during the Conservative Party leadership campaign. We show that while these policies would have little effect on the level of economic output, they might nevertheless change the composition of output and the distribution of income in the directions desired by those that proposed them.

Brexit assumptions and alternative scenarios

This concise summary aims to illustrate the assumptions underpinning our view on the aggregate impact of a No-Deal Brexit on the UK economy, which we published in our latest Review, NIER No. 249 August 2019.

 

Investment in ‘Global Britain’ – gain, retain … or risk economic pain?

 

 

This is a preview from the National Institute Economic Review, August 2019, no 249.

 

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