National Institute Economic Review

The superior educational attainments of pupils in religious foundation schools in England

Summarised from the National Institute Economic Review, number 193, July 2005. To order a the full version of this article or a subscription, please contact Sage Publications by telephone: +44 (0) 20 7324 8701, email: <a href="mailto:subscriptions@sagepub.co.uk">mailto:subscriptions@sagepub.co.uk</a> or online at <a href="http://ner.sagepub.com">http://ner.sagepub.com</a>.

The return to a university education in Great Britain

Summarised from the National Institute Economic Review, number 193, July 2005. To order a the full version of this article or a subscription, please contact Sage Publications by telephone: +44 (0) 20 7324 8701, email: <a href="mailto:subscriptions@sagepub.co.uk">mailto:subscriptions@sagepub.co.uk</a> or online at <a href="http://ner.sagepub.com">http://ner.sagepub.com</a>.

The growth of ICT and industry performance

UK manufacturing productivity has for a long time lagged behind the US. Explanations put forward for the Ôproductivity gap' include disparities in capital stock levels, the quality of the labour force and different rates of technology adoption. The question addressed in this paper is has slower UK up-take of information technology exacerbated the productivity gap. Can this account for the slow down in the manufacturing sector in the mid-1990s, a period when the US experienced substantial growth?

National Institute Economic Review: July 2005

The National Institute Economic Review is the quarterly journal of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, published quarterly in January, April, July and October of each year. Each edition includes detailed forecasts of both UK and World economies, commentary on current issues, a comprehensive statistical appendix and articles by NIESR researchers and external authors.

Assessing the performance of local government

Summarised from the National Institute Economic Review, number 193, July 2005. To order a the full version of this article or a subscription, please contact Sage Publications by telephone: +44 (0) 20 7324 8701, email: <a href="mailto:subscriptions@sagepub.co.uk">mailto:subscriptions@sagepub.co.uk</a> or online at <a href="http://ner.sagepub.com">http://ner.sagepub.com</a>.

Forecast comparisons

Summarised from the National Institute Economic Review, number 193, July 2005. To order a the full version of this article or a subscription, please contact Sage Publications by telephone: +44 (0) 20 7324 8701, email: <a href="mailto:subscriptions@sagepub.co.uk">mailto:subscriptions@sagepub.co.uk</a> or online at <a href="http://ner.sagepub.com">http://ner.sagepub.com</a>.

The National Institute Density Forecasts of Inflation

Summarised from the National Institute Economic Review, number 193, July 2005. To order a the full version of this article or a subscription, please contact Sage Publications by telephone: +44 (0) 20 7324 8701, email: <a href="mailto:subscriptions@sagepub.co.uk">mailto:subscriptions@sagepub.co.uk</a> or online at <a href="http://ner.sagepub.com">http://ner.sagepub.com</a>.

How forecasts evolve: the growth forecasts of the Federal Reserve and the Bank of England

Summarised from the National Institute Economic Review, number 193, July 2005. To order a the full version of this article or a subscription, please contact Sage Publications by telephone: +44 (0) 20 7324 8701, email: <a href="mailto:subscriptions@sagepub.co.uk">mailto:subscriptions@sagepub.co.uk</a> or online at <a href="http://ner.sagepub.com">http://ner.sagepub.com</a>.

Paying for university: the impact of increasing costs on student employment, debt and satisfaction

The costs of higher education in the UK have shifted increasingly from the state to the student (and students' families). In

1998, a fee contribution of £1,000 per annum was introduced for new entrants to full-time degree courses. This paper

examines its effect on debt, term-time employment and student satisfaction. The analysis uses data from a survey of two

cohorts of students and identifies how the impact varied with student and course characteristics. Fees led to an increase

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