labour productivity

Publication date: 6 Feb 2019 | Publication type: National Institute Economic Review | Theme: Trade, Investment & Productivity | External authors: Wales, P | JEL classification: J24, E24, D24 | Journal: National Institute Economic Review Issue 247 | Publisher: Sage Publications, London
The UK’s recent productivity performance has been strikingly weak. Output per hour worked, which increased by around 2.1 per cent per year in the decade leading up to the economic downturn, increased by just 0.2 per cent per year in the ten years following the global financial crisis. This paper...
Publication date: 4 May 2018 | Publication type: National Institute Economic Review | Theme: Macroeconomics | External authors: Erken, H, Hayat, R, Prins, C, Heijmerikx, M, de Vreede, I | JEL classification: F15, F17, F43, D24 | Journal: National Institute Economic Review Issue 244 | Publisher: Sage Publications, London
We analyse the costs of Brexit. The results show that by 2030 a hard Brexit would reduce cumulative GDP growth by 18 percentage points compared to a situation where the UK continued its EU membership. The economic damage in our FTA and soft Brexit scenarios is less severe than in our hard Brexit...
Publication date: 2 Aug 2017 | Publication type: National Institute Economic Review | Theme: Macroeconomics | Authors: Chadha, J S, Kara, A | External authors: Labonne, P | JEL classification: E01, E32, E44 | Journal: National Institute Economic Review Issue 241 | Publisher: Sage Publications, London
The financial crisis has led to a change in the mix of capital and labour employed in the UK and a sharp decline in total factor productivity. This has meant that labour productivity has not recovered to any great degree since the financial crisis. We explore the role of overall and sectoral...
Publication date: 11 Apr 2012 | Publication type: NIESR Discussion Paper | Theme: Trade, Investment & Productivity, Employment & Social policy | Authors: Bryson, A | JEL classification: J50, L22, L23, L24 | NIESR discussion paper number: 392
Using nationally representative workplace data we find the use of temporary agency workers (TAW) is positively associated with financial performance in the British private sector and weakly associated with higher sales per employee. However TAW is not associated with value added per employee....