migration

It’s all about the flex: Preference, Flexibility and Power in the Employment of EU Migrants in Low-Skilled Sectors

In the last ten years, EU migrants have come to play an important role in the UK labour force. They have become increasingly present in low-skilled occupations, where the largest proportional increase has been migration from Eastern and Central European countries. Drawing on research carried out between November 2015 and July 2016 on the employment of EU migrants in the sectors of hospitality, food and drink and construction, we find that EU migrants have met employers’ needs for a flexible labour force but that the use of mobile workers in these sectors is long-standing.

Employers’ responses to Brexit: The perspective of employers in low skilled sectors

The EU referendum gave an equal say to all eligible voters but some had more of a stake in the outcome than others, among them employers of EU migrants. Between the end of 2015 and early 2016 we interviewed 24 employers in the low skilled sectors of food and drink, hospitality and construction about free movement and the implications of a Leave vote, publishing our findings in April.

The long-term macroeconomic effects of lower migration to the UK

This paper looks at the possible scenarios of migration policy should the UK leave the EU. The paper uses an OLG model which brings together labour market, fiscal and other macroeconomic effects in one framework. It also adds a dynamic perspective, differentiates between natives and different categories of immigrants and captures age and qualification compositional effects.

Free movement of services, migration and leaving the EU

For many people the key question in the referendum is whether a vote to leave will enable the UK to take back control of its borders. So for them the focus is primarily on Article 45 on the Treaty of the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) which allows free movement of workers. But for individuals much movement to other EU Member States is covered by Article 56 TFEU on the free movement of services.

The impact of free movement on the labour market: case studies of hospitality, food processing and construction

This report is an in-depth study of three sectors employing large numbers of EU migrants – hospitality, food and drink, and construction – and finds employers concerned about their ability to fill vacancies if free movement of labour is reduced or comes to an end. Some are also worried that any EU workers they currently employ would lose their right to live and work in the UK in the event of Brexit. 

The research also reveals that:

Changing the debate: video animation on the impact of immigration on the UK

Opinion polls have shown for some time that the public sees immigration as one of the most important issues facing Britain (Ipsos Mori, 2015). At the same time, public understanding of evidence on the economic impacts of immigration is poor and strongly influenced by the media. This in turn affects the quality and content of public debate and the policy formulation process. The question behind this report is whether attitudes towards immigration can be influenced by evidence, presented in a simple and straightforward way, through a short video animation.

Europe's refugee crisis: facts and policy responses

This Policy Brief was written by Yano Moussavi, who is currently a Research Intern at NIESR, and is a postgraduate student at the London School of Economics.  NIESR's work on mobility and immigration issues in the European Union is supported by the ESRC's "Britain in a Changing Europe" programme.

 

The public sees international students as an asset and source of talent

What do the public think about international students? Do they see them simply as generating revenue for universities or as longer term migrants who can bring new talent to the UK? New research by British Future shows that there is support for international students among the general public who both recognise the benefits they bring and believe we should make us of their skills and talent.

Geographical labour mobility in the context of the crisis - European Commission

 - EThe widening economic asymmetries within the European Union have called into question the ability of labour mobility to act as a shock absorber within the EU. While free movement of workers within the EU was established more than 40 years ago, the rate of mobility within the EU has remained relatively low compared to other free mobility regions such as the US, Canada and Australia. While emigration from the Periphery has increased significantly since 2008, in absolute terms the level of mobility flows from this region remains extremely limited.

Top team diversity, cities and business performance

Like many Western countries, the UK has become substantially more ethnically and culturally diverse. The 2011 Census makes this crystal clear. Since 2001, the foreign-born population in England and Wales has jumped from 4.6 to 7.5m. At the same time, the ‘white British’ ethnic group shrank from 87.5-80% of the population. What are the economic impacts of these deep demographic shifts, and what do they mean for cities?

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