pay

Use of Agency Workers in the Public Sector

Commissioned by the Office of Manpower Economics, the purpose of this report was to better understand the use of agency staff in the UK public sector, particularly in health and education. The research aimed to outline and improve the evidence base, in order to understand the labour market for agency staff and how it is determined by pay, demand and supply.

Ownership and Pay in Britain

Drawing on principal-agent perspectives on corporate governance, this paper examines whether employees’ hourly pay is linked to ownership dispersion.  Using linked workplace-worker data from the British Workplace Employment Relations Survey (WERS) 2011, we find average hourly pay is higher in dispersed ownership workplaces.  The raw gap of 30 log points falls to 8 log points when we control for differences in worker and workplace characteristics.

Pay Equity After the Equality Act 2010: Does Sexual Orientation Still Matter?

Using nationally-representative linked employer-employee data for Britain I find bisexual men earn around 31% less per hour than heterosexual men, a differential that falls to 20% having controlled for demographic, job and workplace characteristics.  The gap is apparent within workplaces and within detailed occupational classifications.

Pay Equity After the Equality Act 2010: Does Sexual Orientation Still Matter?

Using linked employer-employee data for Britain I find bisexual men earn around 31% less per hour less than heterosexual employees, a differential that falls to 20% having controlled for demographic, job and workplace characteristics.  The gap is apparent within workplaces and within detailed occupational classifications.