performance pay

Publication date: 12 May 2017 | Publication type: Journal article/book/chapter | Theme: Education & Labour | Authors: Bryson, A, Forth, J, Stokes, L | Journal: Human Resource Management Journal Vol. 27 Issue 4
Theory suggests that performance pay (PP) can align employees' interests with those of the employer and attract high‐ability workers and incentivise effort but that it may be less effective in the public sector. However, empirical evidence on its incidence and effects is largely confined to the...
Publication date: 22 Mar 2016 | Publication type: Journal article/book/chapter | Theme: Trade, Investment & Productivity | Authors: Forth, J, Stokes, L | External authors: Bryson, A | JEL classification: J33 | Journal: International Journal of Manpower Vol. 37 Issue 2 | Project: The Prevalence and Effects of Performance-Related Pay in Britain | Publisher: Emerald
We use nationally-representative, monthly data on the total wage bill and employment of around 8,500 firms to investigate fluctuations in the economic importance of performance bonuses in Britain over the past 15 years. We decompose the share of the total economy-wide wage bill that is accounted...
Publication date: 10 Apr 2015 | Publication type: NIESR Discussion Paper | Theme: Employment & Social policy | Authors: Bryson, A | External authors: Bryan, M. | Project: The Prevalence and Effects of Performance-Related Pay in Britain
Using data from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) we show performance pay (PP) increased earnings dispersion among men and women, and to a lesser extent among full-time working women, in the decade of economic growth which ended with the recession of 2008. PP was also associated with some...
Publication date: 12 Nov 2014 | Publication type: NIESR Discussion Paper | Theme: Employment & Social policy | Authors: Stokes, L, Bryson, A, Forth, J, Weale, M | NIESR discussion paper number: 440
We examine whether those paid for performance fared better in terms of wage growth and job tenure than their fixed pay counterparts through the most recent recession. In theory we might anticipate that, since performance pay workers share the income risks of economic shocks with their employers,...
Publication date: 28 May 2014 | Publication type: Conference and seminar output | Theme: Employment & Social policy | Authors: Bryson, A, Forth, J, Stokes, L
Poster presentation at Workshop on Firm-Level Analysis of Labour Issues, Louvain-la-Neuve (UCL-Belgium), 28 May 2014
Publication date: 28 May 2014 | Publication type: Conference and seminar output | Theme: Employment & Social policy | Authors: Forth, J, Bryson, A, Stokes, L
Poster presentation at the Workshop on Firm-Level Analysis of Labour Issues, Louvain-la-Neuve (UCL-Belgium), 28 May 2014
Publication date: 22 Sep 2014 | Publication type: Conference and seminar output | Theme: Employment & Social policy | Authors: Bryson, A, Forth, J, Stokes, L
Using nationally representative linked employer-employee data we find one-quarter of employees in Britain are paid for performance. The log hourly wage gap between performance pay and fixed pay employees is .36 points.  This falls to .15 log points after controlling for observable demographic, job...
Publication date: 22 Jul 2014 | Publication type: NIESR Discussion Paper | Theme: Employment & Social policy | Authors: Bryson, A | JEL classification: J33 | NIESR discussion paper number: 433
Using nationally representative linked employer-employee data we find one-quarter of employees in Britain are paid for performance. The log hourly wage gap between performance pay and fixed pay employees is .36 points.  This falls to .15 log points after controlling for observable demographic, job...