Report

National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage Impact Assessment - Counterfactual research

Executive summary

Aims and objectives of counterfactual wage research

Over the summer, the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) conducted an independent review of the methodology used by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) for estimating the cost to business of upratings to the National Minimum Wage (NMW) and National Living Wage (NLW) rates, focusing on the counterfactual underpinning the costs estimate.

Is An 'Englishman's Home' His Pension?

This research project considers whether buying houses may reduce long-term savings in the UK economy. This may explain the UK’s relatively low investment rate and weaker productivity performance over the long term. The study has two parts. First, we present new evidence on the saving behaviour of UK households showing that buying a house with a mortgage results in a lower saving rate, which is likely to mean less pension savings. Second, we examine the consequences for the UK of shifting the allocation of saving from housing and towards business investment. 

The added value of trade unions - A review for the TUC of existing research

The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the current research evidence on the economic impact of workplace union representation. Our review focuses on quantitative studies that have been conducted on good quality, nationally-representative samples of British workplaces or employees, and we rely where possible on results from multivariate statistical analyses which control for observable differences between union and non-union workplaces or employees. We utilise evidence from qualitative case studies where this serves to fill in gaps in the quantitative literature.

The added value of trade unions - New analyses for the TUC of the Workplace Employment Relations Surveys 2004 and 2011

Background to the analysis

To inform debate over the 2016 Trade Union Act the TUC commissioned UCL/NIESR to undertake a three-pronged investigation on the nature of unions and their effects on employers and employees. This comprised:

  • a review of existing literature on union effects
  • new analyses of the Workplace Employment Relations Surveys (WERS)
  • a more detailed investigation of the links between unionisation and work/life balance.

This report focuses on the second element, namely the new analyses of WERS.

Work/life balance and trade unions - Evidence from the Workplace Employment Relations Survey 2011

To inform debate following the passage of the 2016 Trade Union Act the TUC commissioned UCL/NIESR to undertake a three-pronged investigation into the nature of unions and their effects on employers and employees:

Wage growth in Pay Review Body Occupations

This research report by UCL and NIESR describes earnings growth among Pay Review Body (PRB) occupations; compares that growth to earnings growth in comparable non-PRB occupations; and accounts for differences in earnings trajectories between PRB occupations and comparable non-PRB occupations that come from compositional change in the workforces.

NIESR chart pack of the UK’s economic performance across elections since 1992

 

NIESR chart pack of the UK’s economic performance across elections since 1992 

(These figures have been produced with funding from the Nuffield Foundation as part of its work to ensure public debate in the run-up to the General Election and is informed by independent and rigorous evidence)

 

 

International Trends in Insecure Work: A Report for the Trades Union Congress

An increase in insecure forms of work has been identified in most European countries. Arrangements such as fixed-term contracts, temporary working and employment via agencies have proliferated, arguably undermining ‘standard’ employment relationships and the securities they offer. However, while there is widespread agreement on the international expansion of insecure forms of work, the drivers and subsequent nature of that insecurity are thought to be highly variable.

Use of Agency Workers in the Public Sector

Commissioned by the Office of Manpower Economics, the purpose of this report was to better understand the use of agency staff in the UK public sector, particularly in health and education. The research aimed to outline and improve the evidence base, in order to understand the labour market for agency staff and how it is determined by pay, demand and supply.

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