Report

The added value of trade unions - New analyses for the TUC of the Workplace Employment Relations Surveys 2004 and 2011

Background to the analysis

To inform debate over the 2016 Trade Union Act the TUC commissioned UCL/NIESR to undertake a three-pronged investigation on the nature of unions and their effects on employers and employees. This comprised:

  • a review of existing literature on union effects
  • new analyses of the Workplace Employment Relations Surveys (WERS)
  • a more detailed investigation of the links between unionisation and work/life balance.

This report focuses on the second element, namely the new analyses of WERS.

Work/life balance and trade unions - Evidence from the Workplace Employment Relations Survey 2011

To inform debate following the passage of the 2016 Trade Union Act the TUC commissioned UCL/NIESR to undertake a three-pronged investigation into the nature of unions and their effects on employers and employees:

Wage growth in Pay Review Body Occupations

This research report by UCL and NIESR describes earnings growth among Pay Review Body (PRB) occupations; compares that growth to earnings growth in comparable non-PRB occupations; and accounts for differences in earnings trajectories between PRB occupations and comparable non-PRB occupations that come from compositional change in the workforces.

NIESR chart pack of the UK’s economic performance across elections since 1992

 

NIESR chart pack of the UK’s economic performance across elections since 1992 

(These figures have been produced with funding from the Nuffield Foundation as part of its work to ensure public debate in the run-up to the General Election and is informed by independent and rigorous evidence)

 

 

International Trends in Insecure Work: A Report for the Trades Union Congress

An increase in insecure forms of work has been identified in most European countries. Arrangements such as fixed-term contracts, temporary working and employment via agencies have proliferated, arguably undermining ‘standard’ employment relationships and the securities they offer. However, while there is widespread agreement on the international expansion of insecure forms of work, the drivers and subsequent nature of that insecurity are thought to be highly variable.

Use of Agency Workers in the Public Sector

Commissioned by the Office of Manpower Economics, the purpose of this report was to better understand the use of agency staff in the UK public sector, particularly in health and education. The research aimed to outline and improve the evidence base, in order to understand the labour market for agency staff and how it is determined by pay, demand and supply.

Older workers and the workplace: Evidence from the Workplace Employment Relations Survey

This research examines the working experiences of older individuals and the effects of changes in age composition on workplace performance

Powerful Learning Conversations: Evaluation report and executive summary

Powerful Learning Conversations (PLC) sought to improve the feedback that teachers give to pupils in Year 9, by training them to apply techniques used in sports coaching. It is based on the idea that feedback in sports coaching is often provided immediately after a task is performed, and delivered in a way that children are more likely to respond positively to. The training programme adopted a ‘cascade’ model: expert teachers were trained in the approach and then expected to disseminate their training to English and Maths teachers in their school.

ABRA: Online Reading Support Evaluation report and executive summary

Abracadabra (ABRA) is a 20-week online literacy programme composed of phonic fluency and comprehension activities based around a series of age-appropriate texts. Four 15-minute sessions per week are delivered by a teaching assistant (TA) to groups of three to five pupils. This report summarises the findings of a randomised controlled trial assessing the impact of ABRA on literacy outcomes for Year 1 pupils. The trial also assesses the impact of an offline, paper and pencil version of the same intervention (referred to here at ‘the non-ICT intervention’).

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